Books

Young Voices: Life with Diabetes by Hala Khalaf 2005 Published by Novo Nordisk and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. ISBN 0-470-01584-5. Hardcover, $28.95.

So few books give a sense of what it is really like to live with diabetes, especially for children. Young Voices is thirteen stories, about thirteen young people, who live with diabetes everyday. Ten have type 1, three have type 2. They are young children and young adults. They live across the world, in very different worlds. But they share a bond with each other that transcends typical friendships — something that we see at every Children with Diabetes conference. In Young Voices you will find a beautiful book, rich with photographs, filled with stories, teaching hope and perseverance. Highly Recommended.

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Young Adult Type 1 Diabetes Realities by Nicole Johnson, DrPH, MPH, MA 2014 CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform. ISBN 1499173148. Paperback, $10.00.

Nicole Johnson’s new book, Young Adult Type 1 Diabetes Realities, enlists the help of several well-known adults with type 1 diabetes (Gary Hall, Jr., Phil Southerland, and Kerri Sparling, to name a few) and several knowledgeable health care professionals to offer advice and guidance to older teens and young adults on making a successful transition to adulthood with type 1 diabetes. There are precious few resources to help young people and their families through this challenging time, and Nicole does a great job of providing concrete guidance and advice. Young Adult Type 1 Diabetes Realities belongs in every family of older teens because it can help prepare the teen — and the parents — for the exciting transition to young adulthood. Recommended for older teens and young adults with type 1 — and their parents.

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Yes I Can! Yes You Can! by Denny Dressman and Jay Leeuwenburg 2005 Published by ComServ Books, LLC. ISBN 0-977-42830-3. $16.95, softcover.

Being diagnosed with diabetes requires a new way of thinking. You learn about insulin, checking blood sugars, carbs, exercise — and the importance of planning. But you don’t give up your dreams, and you don’t take “No” for an answer. That’s the message of Yes I Can! Yes You Can!, a book about Jay Leeuwenburg, who was diagnosed at age 12 and went on to play nine years in the NFL as an offensive lineman. Written by Denny Dressman and Jay, the book alternates between Denny putting everything into perspective and Jay sharing his personal experiences, such as:

I knew from just there mere fact of going to my normal three-month doctor visits that there were thousands upon thousands of children who were seeking answers to what I thought were just basic questions about living with and managing diabetes. And they were getting such outrageous advice that I couldn’t understand. For instance, ‘You can’t be a cheerleader. You can’t play soccer.’ The message was, you can’t do these things because you’re a diabetic. I thought it would be an injustice not to use my career and that instant celebrity as a forum. So pretty early on I made a committment that I would send the message to youngsters that, ‘You know what, you can do anything you want.’

Jay’s experiences and attitude can help anyone who is struggling with a new diagnosis or who is overwhelmed with caring for themselves. His experience is about persevering in the face of the challenge of diabetes and never letting it be an excuse. That’s a great story for everyone. Highly Recommended.

— JSH

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Wizdom for Parents by American Diabetes Association Free by calling 1-800-DIABETES (in the United States).

To help educate both newly diagnosed children and their parents, the American Diabetes Association has devised an excellent source of information, the “Wizdom Kit.” There are two spiral bound booklets, one for parents and one for kids. The booklets are full of colorful illustrations and diagrams and cover everything from how to draw up a shot of mixed insulin to diabetes issues at school.

To help kids learn about diabetes, the kit includes three juggling balls (instructions for juggling included), which represent the three things someone with diabetes must juggle: diet, exercise, and insulin. Contact the ADA at 1-800-DIABETES to order a kit. Highly recommended.

— Review by Brenda Hitchcock

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When You’re a Parent with Diabetes by Kathryn Gregorio Palmer 2006 Published by the Healthy Living Books / Hatherleigh Press. Paperback, 123 pages. $14.95 ISBN 1-57826-232-1.

Many books offer guidance and support to parents who have kids with diabetes, but until now there has been nothing specifically for parents who have diabetes. When You’re a Parent with Diabetes will help adults with diabetes with the challenges of being parents, and the unique challenges they face having diabetes (e.g., how do you hide your juice boxes from your kids?).

As the parent of a child with diabetes, I can’t fully appreciate what it means to have diabetes, but I am thankful and grateful for Palmer’s insightful book. One day, our children with diabetes will become parents with diabetes, and When You’re a Parent with Diabetes can help show them the way. Highly recommended for adults with diabetes.

— Jeff Hitchcock

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When Diabetes Hits Home: The Whole Family’s Guide to Emotional Health by Wendy Satin Rapaport, LCSW, PsyD. 1998 Published by the American Diabetes Association. ISBN 0-945448-88-0. US$19.95. Paperback, 288 pages.

Dr. Wendy Satin Rapaport provides good advice for adults with diabetes, parents of children with diabetes and siblings, friends, and other family members. While the focus isn’t strictly children with diabetes, there are several chapters that can be helpful for parents. Dr. Rapaport uses the term “reframing” in her counseling; in other words, she encourages people to use positive terms rather than negative or critical terms when dealing with a person with diabetes. For example, rather than saying “Why haven’t you done your blood test?” one should say something like, “You really should test your blood sugar now because dinner is almost ready.” Dr. Rapaport also notes that people with diabetes should not get discouraged when their blood sugars are high despite following “the rules.” Another subject she specifically mentions with respect to parental care of children with diabetes is “burnout.” She stresses that both parents should learn how to handle all the tasks associated with managing a child’s diabetes.

In general, Dr. Rapaport believes that support, both physical and emotional, is important for the overall well being of a person with diabetes. She believes it is important for a person with diabetes to live life to the fullest, and that having fun is essential.

— Review by Brenda Hitchcock

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When a Child Has Diabetes by Denis Daneman, Marcia Frank, and Kusiel Perlman 1999 A Firely Book. ISBN 1-55209-331-X. US$14.95. Paperback, 217 pages.

When a child has diabetes, a parent’s life changes forever, but the book of this title by Denis Daneman, Marcia Frank and Kusiel Perlman can help make life after diagnosis somewhat less stressful. This very well-written book is very concise, thorough and easy to understand. They even give a detailed explanation of how to draw up an insulin shot, should the parents have been frazzled or nervous when this procedure was explained initially. The authors provide advice on how to deal with children of all ages, from toddlerhood to the teens. Basic information about complications and a brief discussion about the search for a cure are also included. Highly recommended.

— Review by Brenda Hitchcock

When a child has diabetes, a parent’s life changes forever, but the book of this title by Denis Daneman, Marcia Frank and Kusiel Perlman can help make life after diagnosis somewhat less stressful. This very well-written book is very concise, thorough and easy to understand. They even give a detailed explanation of how to draw up an insulin shot, should the parents have been frazzled or nervous when this procedure was explained initially. The authors provide advice on how to deal with children of all ages, from toddlerhood to the teens. Basic information about complications and a brief discussion about the search for a cure are also included. Highly recommended.

— Review by Brenda Hitchcock

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Using Insulin by John Walsh, P.A., C.D.E., and Ruth Roberts, M.A., Chandrasekhar Varma, M.D., F.A.C.E., F.A.C.P, and Timothy Bailey, M.D., F.A.C.E., F.A.C.P, with "Kids and Teens" by Shannon Brow, R.N., B.S., C.D.E. 2003 Published by Torrey Pines Press. 342 pages, paperback. US$23.95.

If you want to get the most out of injection therapy, you need Using Insulin. Covering everything from determining carb and correction factors, total daily doses and injection boluses, and selecting the correct insulins to meet your needs, Using Insulin is the first book to offer for injection users the detailed scientific basis behind intensive insulin therapy that Pumping Insulin offers to pump users. The tables and charts will help you get the most out of injection therapy. Highly recommended for anyone using injection therapy.

Torrey Pines Press
1030 West Upas Street
San Diego, CA 92103-3821
1-800-988-4772 (US)
1-619-497-0900

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Until There is a Cure: The Latest and Greatest in Diabetes Self-Care by Gary Scheiner, MS, CDE 2013 Published by Spry Publishing, Ann Arbor. ISBN 978-1-938170-10-2. US$15.95.

Gary Scheiner, a long-time, regular faculty member at CWD conferences, begins his latest book with great wisdom: “The goal of diabetes management is … to manage blood sugar as effectively as possible so that it does not keep us from enjoying life to the fullest.” From there, Gary offers current advice on many aspects of diabetes care, including nutrition, with a special focus on understanding the glycemic index of foods; modern insulin therapy, including mixing analogs for MDI users and the benefits of pump therapy (“The type of pump should be chosen by the person who will be using it, not his or her physician” — more wise words); other medications used in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, including some type 2 drugs that are used off-label by people with type 1; strategies for getting the most out of blood glucose monitoring and CGM; and finally, a list of resources to help when you need it, including many suggestions within the Diabetes Online Community. Until There is a Cure is a relatively quick read, and I found myself hearing Gary speaking in his calm, reassuring voice as I flipped through the pages. Gary’s latest will make a nice addition to your diabetes library.

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The Unofficial Guide to Living with Diabetes by Maria Thomas with Loren W. Greene, M.D. 1999 Published by Macmillan. ISBN 0-02-862919-1. US$15.95.

With over 500 pages, The Unofficial Guide to Living with Diabetes is a compreshensive guide to both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Written in an easy-to-understand manner, with helpful sidebar tidbits on almost every page, this book is a worthy addition to your diabetes library. The material is very up-to-date, with quotes from Miss America Nicole Johnson and research updates. There’s even a historical overview of diabetes. Parents will appreciate the section about children with diabetes at school, which explains the differences between Individualized Education Plans (IEPs) and Section 504 plans. Appendices contain important documents (such as our One Page Care Guide for teachers and nutritional information on a variety of food.

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